Turkey Pho

Vietnamese pho filled with shredded turkey and then topped with thinly sliced red onions, cilantro, and bean sprouts. This turkey pho is the perfect warm meal to chase away the cold.

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

There’s something about turkey and soups that I can’t seem to resist.

Just two days ago I posted spicy miso ramen using turkey, and today, we’re having chicken pho, but instead of chicken, we’re using leftover turkey from Thanksgiving.

Roasted turkey already has so much flavor on its own. But when they’re added to the soup, oh my god. The soup has so much more depth. I can eat this for days. For reals.

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

Traditional pho broth takes hours to make. You add spices, onions, ginger, and seasoning to the broth and allow the soup to simmer for hours so that the flavors have a chance to develop. I have no patience for that. I mean, if I want pho, I want it now. I don’t want to wait several hours before I get to eat it. By then, I probably have cravings for something else. So, this version of pho can be made in about 40 minutes. So simple to make and so very delicious.

I’m pretty sure this will become one of your go to recipes to keep warm this winter. =)

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

First, add chicken broth and water to a large pot. Add a medium sized onion, quartered, into the pot along with star anise and ginger. Allow the soup to simmer for about 20 minutes until the onion has softened and the soup has become very aromatic.

Add brown sugar, fish sauce, and a little bit of salt. Stir to incorporate the ingredients and allow them to simmer for an additional 10 minutes.

If you taste the soup, you’ll notice that it’s slightly bland. That’s done on purpose. The turkey that you’ll add into the soup will add additional flavor to the soup. If you add to much salt or fish sauce, your soup will become too salty. It’s easier to adjust your seasoning by adding more at the end then trying to fix a dish that is already over seasoned.

Add the turkey to the soup and turn the heat down to the lowest setting.

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

In the meantime, boil water in a small or medium sized pot. Once the water comes to a boil, place the pho noodles into a strainer and drop the noodles into the water. The noodles will cook in about a minute. I like to estimate portion sizes so that I can cook the noodles by individual portions. Once the noodles are cooked, all I have to do is place the noodles into the bowl. Use a ladle to pour soup over the noodles.

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

Top the noodles with bean sprouts, cilantro, basil, sliced jalapenos, or any other topping that you might like. I love my pho with Sriracha. If you ever eat pho with me, you’ll probably be shocked by how red my soup gets.

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

Serve the turkey pho hot. Because soups like this are meant to be eaten hot, not warm.

Enjoy!

Turkey Pho | Cooking with a Wallflower

Turkey Pho
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Vietnamese pho filled with shredded turkey and then topped with thinly sliced red onions, cilantro, and bean sprouts. This turkey pho is the perfect warm meal to chase away the cold.
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Asian
Serves: 2-3 servings
Ingredients
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 medium sized onion, quartered
  • 1 tablespoon ginger
  • 2 anise stars
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • ½ tablespoon fish sauce
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup shredded turkey, more to your liking
  • 2-3 cups dry rice noodles
  • Cilantro, Jalapeno, Basil, Chili Peppers, Bean Sprouts for garnish
  • Sriracha and Hoisin sauce, if desired
Directions:
  1. First, add chicken broth and water to a large pot over medium to high heat. Add a medium sized onion, quartered, into the pot along with star anise and ginger. Allow the soup to simmer for about 20 minutes until the onion has softened and the soup has become very aromatic.
  2. Add brown sugar, fish sauce, and a little bit of salt. Stir to incorporate the ingredients and allow them to simmer for an additional 10 minutes.
  3. Add the turkey to the soup and turn the heat down to the lowest setting.
  4. In the meantime, boil water in a small or medium sized pot. Once the water comes to a boil, place the pho noodles into a strainer and drop the noodles into the water. The noodles will cook in about a minute. Place the cooked noodles into a bowl. Use a ladle to pour soup over the noodles.
  5. Top the noodles with bean sprouts, cilantro, basil, sliced jalapenos, or any other topping that you might like.
  6. Serve the turkey pho hot.

 

 

20 comments

  1. equinoxio21 says:

    I love Pho. (Lived in Cambodia and Vietnam for a brief while). I actually knew how to do one. So the recipe is a good reminder. Now a turkey Pho? The equivalent of a Vietnamese Thanksgiving? 😉

  2. kiwidutch says:

    I have a plastic box in the freezer into which I throw (Cleaned!!!) veggie clippings. Onion and potato skins, the end bits of fresh herbs, stumps of celery, leeks etc.

    Throw it all with water into crock-pot / slow cooker in the evening and let it do it’s magic all night. In the morning you will have golden goodness of lovely stock just strain it and freeze for use later when you need it.

    It uses up old bits and pieces of veg that would otherwise be thrown away and produces easy, cheap, delicious stock. Win win. I made a step by step post about it here;

    https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2009/07/02/keeping-all-the-balls-in-the-air-healthy-home-cooking-shortcuts/

    Your Pho recipe looks heavenly !!!

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