Prickly Pear Lemonade

Prickly pear blended with lemonade to create an amazingly refreshing drink, perfect for a warm day in fall. Easy to make, this beverage is great for entertaining guests.

Prickly Pear Lemonade | Cooking with a Wallflower

Isn’t the color to this prickly pear lemonade so pretty and vibrant? If you can’t already tell, I like my food to be colorful.

This drink is super easy to make too with just five ingredients and mint for garnish.

When I’m out grocery shopping,  I always come across boxes filled with prickly pears.  I figured I should take it as a sign, that it’s meant to be. So I bought a few.

I wasn’t sure at first what to do with it. But I didn’t think I could go wrong with making it into a beverage. So ta da! We now have prickly pear lemonade!

Prickly Pear Lemonade | Cooking with a Wallflower

Prickly pears, if you haven’t encountered them before, are fruits from a cactus tree. They’re sweet (well, it depends on the individual fruit) and pink on the inside with a multicolored outer skin. Unfortunately, they have soo many seeds. It’s actually really annoying because it’s impossible to avoid the seeds. So how do people eat it? Sometimes they just swallow the seeds or spit them out after eating the fruit. The technique is pretty similar to eating pomegranates or guava. However, these seeds are much harder than the seeds of pomegranates or guava. Avoid biting into them. Otherwise, you’ll probably feel some pain.

Prickly Pear Lemonade | Cooking with a Wallflower

Prickly Pear Lemonade | Cooking with a Wallflower

But don’t worry. I have a way around this.

Make your lemonade, and add it to a blender. I used a Magic Bullet for convenience. Use a spoon to scoop the fruit with the seeds into the blender.

Prickly Pear Lemonade | Cooking with a Wallflower

Blend the prickly pear with the lemonade for about 30 seconds. You’re not trying to pulverize the seeds. What you’re trying to do is separate the fruit from the seeds. So a quick whirl in the blender is perfect for that.

Pour the prickly pear lemonade through a fine mesh or a strainer to separate the seeds from the lemonade.

Prickly Pear Lemonade | Cooking with a Wallflower

Pour the prickly pear lemonade into a glass with several ice cubes and serve cold.

Enjoy!

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Prickly Pear Lemonade | Cooking with a Wallflower

Dental Hygiene Tip #6: To avoid stains on your teeth, avoid eating/drinking anything dark in color. That includes: coffee, tea, soy sauce, and so forth.

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Prickly Pear Lemonade

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1 serving

Prickly Pear Lemonade

Prickly pear blended with lemonade to create an amazingly refreshing drink, perfect for a warm day in fall. Easy to make, this beverage is great for entertaining guests.

Author: Andrea Giang

Ingredients

1 prickly pear

1 cup water

2 tablespoons lemon juice

½ tablespoon granulated sugar (or sweetener of choice)

5-6 ice cubes

2-3 mint leaves for garnish (optional)

Directions

Mix the lemon juice and granulated sugar with water. Pour the lemonade into a blender.

Slice the prickly pear in half. Use a spoon to scoop out the fruit with the seeds, and add them into the blender.

Blend for about 15-30 seconds to remove the fruit from the seeds.

Pour the prickly pear lemonade through a strainer or a fine mesh to separate the seeds from the lemonade.

Add ice cubes and mint leaves to the glass of prickly pear lemonade.

Serve immediately cold.

http://cookingwithawallflower.com/2014/10/12/prickly-pear-lemonade/

 

96 comments

  1. Bec J. H. says:

    I had no idea that it was possible to eat a prickly pear, or even that they had fruit! Where I live (in Australia) prickly pears are a pest and usually only seen in gardens that are very, very un-cared-for and are inevitably home to a large number of spiders! You learn something new every day…

  2. Rae says:

    Wow, it reminds me of eating soursops… they’re super good in smoothies too, but this fruit seems harder to tackle with those smaller seeds! Still I might try it out since the color is so appetizing!

  3. Daniel M. Pliska says:

    Andrea,
    Nice photos in your blog, I have a tip for you for your mint. Put into ice water for a few minutes and then blot it dry just before you use it. This will refresh it and make it look much better.

  4. 53old says:

    The spots on the prickly pears that look like white dots are full of what can best be described as miniature “fuzzy cactus thorns”.

    The store bought ones have these removed.

    If you pick your own prickly pears, use hot dog tongs and remove “the fuzz” by passing the spots over a flame from a gas stove, gas BBQ or small propane torch. The heat will singe the fuzzy thorns without hurting the fruit. A rinse under running water completes the process.

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